Abstract Art

Of all the genres and styles of art, I must admit to being the most confused by abstract. Sometimes, I really am at a loss to see the difference between abstract artwork hanging on a gallery wall and that of a scrawling created by my daughter back in her kindergarten days (and a few of those do still hang, framed upon my walls).

So, is it all just in the eye of the beholder or something we can learn to understand and appreciate? Like many things in life, perhaps knowledge is the key.

Abstract art is artwork without a recognisable subject and one that does not relate to something external or even try to look like something particular. In fairly basic terms, abstract art is where the colour, the form and often even the materials themselves are the subject of the painting. Abstract art is totally non-objective and non-representational.

Artworks of an abstract nature can be either geometric or fluid, with apparent spontaneity which misrepresents the actual careful execution and planning of the creation process. Also a part of the abstract genre is figurative abstractions, the representation through art of things that are not visual such as emotions, feelings, experiences and sounds. Details are eliminated leaving only an essence or just part of the recognisable form.

In the early 19th century, Impressionism, Fauvism and Cubism broke with the tradition that art needed to ‘represent something’ opening the door for abstract art to evolve. These earlier styles led to the embracement of the idea that the colour, lines, forms and textures could in fact be the subject rather than just part of the artwork.

The popularity of abstract was apparent in the 1940s with action painting coming to the fore. Action abstract painting saw paint being dripped, smeared, thrown and spattered to create the work of art. This style was the cohesion of abstract and expressionism; abstract expressionism.

‘Of all the arts, abstract painting is the most difficult. It demands that you know how to draw well, that you have a heightened sensitivity for composition and for colours and that you be a true poet. This last is essential’ – Wassily Kandinsky.

Well known abstract artists: Wassily Kandinsky and Jackson Pollock.

The Key, Jackson Pollock 1946

The Key, Jackson Pollock 1946

Read more about other styles of art at the Art Matters blog or contact Ellen Michel if you’re ready to give abstract a try for yourself. By enrolling in the Ellen Michel School of Painting you will receive expert tutoring and direction.

Categories Art Matters

Leave a Reply